Diary of a (former) Home-schooler

The Vanity of…Profanity?

The Vanity of…Profanity?

profanityswearing-at-work

Something that is profane is (according to Google): relating or devoted to that which is not sacred or biblical; secular rather than religious. Similarly, to profane something means to treat (something sacred) with irreverence or disrespect.

With these definitions in mind, the meaning of “profanity” becomes all the clearer.

The Bible has a lot to say about how we use out voices and, thus, about…

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Super Planet Crash by Stefano Meschiari— Can you feel the gravity?

The main goal of the game is to make a planetary system of your own creation be stable (i.e. no planet is ejected, or collides with another body). This is of course exceedingly easy when your system comprises of a few Earth-mass planets, but dynamical instability can quickly set in when adding a lot of heavier bodies (from giant planets, all the way to stellar companions).
Super Planet Crash by Stefano Meschiari— Can you feel the gravity?

The main goal of the game is to make a planetary system of your own creation be stable (i.e. no planet is ejected, or collides with another body). This is of course exceedingly easy when your system comprises of a few Earth-mass planets, but dynamical instability can quickly set in when adding a lot of heavier bodies (from giant planets, all the way to stellar companions).

Super Planet Crash by Stefano Meschiari— Can you feel the gravity?

The main goal of the game is to make a planetary system of your own creation be stable (i.e. no planet is ejected, or collides with another body). This is of course exceedingly easy when your system comprises of a few Earth-mass planets, but dynamical instability can quickly set in when adding a lot of heavier bodies (from giant planets, all the way to stellar companions).


In Beachcomber’s hilarious columns about the Apostropher Royal in The Express, a certain perversely comforting law is often reiterated: the Law of Conservation of Apostrophes. A heresy since the 13th century, this law states that a balance exists in nature: ‘For every apostrophe omitted from an it’s, there is an extra one put into an its.’ Thus the number of apostrophes in circulation remains constant, even if this means we have double to reason to go and bang our heads against a wall.

— Lynne Truss, Eats, Shoots & Leaves